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Welcome to To Market. We talk about food and the people who produce it.

 
Winter 2017 Letter From the Editor

Winter 2017 Letter From the Editor

Some New Englanders welcome winter as an opportunity to lace up their ice skates, strap on their snowshoes or hit the slopes, maximizing their enjoyment of our northeastern climate. Others prefer to huddle inside with some freshly baked bread, hot chocolate or a nice hot toddy, admiring the wintry scene from as close to the fire as is safe. 

That’s me, inside by the fire. Happily, even though it’s winter in New England and the ground is frozen, I’m well stocked with freshly milled flour, craft bourbon and enough other goodies so I should be fine for a while.

And global warming notwithstanding, this could be a long, cold winter, as those of us who woke up to a new reality last November try to figure out how to keep making progress on issues that are important to us when our challenges may be bigger than ever. Fortunately, New Englanders have never shrunk back from a challenge. And we have people like Representative Jim McGovern, featured inside, working for us. For roughly 20 years he has been a leader in the fight against hunger and was recognized for his work by the James Beard Foundation last fall. Michael Floreak’s interview with the congressman, conducted in late summer, is all the more poignant today, since the battles he continues to fight may well get tougher under a new administration. 

Sustainability will continue to be not only a buzzword but an important subject, for To Market and for the nation. Barton Seaver explains what he thinks the word means for fisheries; you might find his take surprising, certainly interesting. Back on land, farmer and nutritionist Diana Rodgers discusses humane slaughter and how the practice affects meat.

Looking back on years of New England practicality, historian and writer Clara Silverstein examines the history of root cellars, which date to Colonial times when people relied on them to get through the winter, and introduces some local traditionalists who are bringing them back. For modern-day inspiration, Leigh Vincola shines light on the creative ways the region’s numerous colleges and universities are reducing or eliminating food waste. 

Finally, if you want to totally indulge in some of New England’s finest winter fun, food and drink, Vermont writer Maria Buteux Reade guides us on a Northeast Kingdom ramble. Or you can sit inside by the fireand read about it.

 

Cheers,

Andrea Pyenson
Managing Editor

A Ramble Through Vermont's Northeast Kingdom

A Ramble Through Vermont's Northeast Kingdom

A New England Apple Primer

A New England Apple Primer